Scoop Mensink on the job for 25 years

In this day and age of change, staying with something for 25 years is quite the accomplishment, but that is exactly what Evelyn Mensink has done. She has been writing Lime Springs Locals for 25 years—since the issue of October 4, 1984.
She took over for Kathy Grant, her back-door neighbor. Husband of 67 years Kenny remembers, “She asked you to take over. She didn’t want to be tied down.”
And, just so this is clear . . . the Locals have never slowed the Mensinks down. They are on the go all the time. (If you don’t believe me, check out the Locals!) Although Evelyn jokes, “Winter is on its way, so right now I go while I can!” They keep busy just staying in touch with their seven children, 24 grandchildren, 31 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandsons!
Because of her part-time job, Evelyn is one of the best-informed people in town. But, Kenny helps by bringing home news from the coffee shop.
Evelyn starts making her calls on Sunday evening. She sits at her sewing machine table in the spare room and spreads out her “Bible.” It has 25 years worth of names and phone numbers. Some are crossed off for those who have moved or passed away and others have children and grandchildren’s names beside them to make remembering and spelling names easier. After all these years, she pretty uch knows the answers but it’s always nice to have a cheat sheet!
She calls a few of her regulars on Sunday night because of those who work on Mondays. Some calls take a few minutes others take 10 minutes or more—depending on how chatty everyone is feeling.
One of her favorite “calls” is to Claire and Dorothy Anderlik. “Kenny and I go to their house to get their news on Monday morning and have coffee.”
After getting a caffeine and sugar boost, Evelyn gets down to business and finishes her calls at home and then deciphers her notes and rewrites  her column. All together it takes her about six or seven hours.
She readily admits the chatting takes the most time. “Sometimes I’m the first one who calls after an event and the person will tell me all about it, but then ask for it not to go in the paper. But that’s okay. I enjoy talking with them.”
When Evelyn started, she had over 20 regulars. She has added and subtracted to that number and now calls about 15 regulars. Others call her to give her the news if something special happens.
“When I first started, Becky Jo helped me. She wrote the locals all over.” Evelyn’s very first local was “Mr. Carl Laue of Merrill, Wis. spent a few days visiting at the Ethel Laue home.”
Evelyn said her job is interesting and she enjoys visiting with people. “I’d miss that if I wasn’t doing it.” She would also definitely miss being informed. She says she learns a lot of stuff that gets put in the paper and a lot of stuff that doesn’t!
Happy 25th anniversary Evelyn, and thanks from the staff at the Lime Springs Herald. We couldn’t do it without you.

In this day and age of change, staying with something for 25 years is quite the accomplishment, but that is exactly what Evelyn Mensink has done. She has been writing Lime Springs Locals for 25 years—since the issue of October 4, 1984.

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Warren Williams, 67, former LS

Warren Williams passed away Monday afternoon, September 28, 2009 at St. Marys Hospital in Rochester. He had been  undergoing treatment, including extensive heart surgery, for about six weeks.
Warren was the son of the late Earl and Flavia Williams. He has one brother, Claire, who lives in Des Moines.
Warren married Sharla Galvin in 1962. They have three daughters: Jane, Carrie and Jessica. Each of the daughter’s families is blessed with two daughters. In addition, Jane has “Charlie,” one-and-a-half. Not surprisingly, Warren thought he was pretty special!
Their home has been in the Brainerd area for the last 30 years or so, where Warren was a banker.
Warren’s last “public appearance” in Lime Springs was during the 2004 LSHS reunion, when he passed a Memory Box to the next person who would have graduated from LSHS had it not burned and forced student to go to Crestwood. As Warren (LSHS ’60) put it, “I was the last person to walk across the stage and be handed a diploma from Lime Springs High School.”

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Effie G. Morris, 90, former Chester resident

Effie G. Morris, 90, of Waterloo, Iowa and formerly of Chester, Iowa died at Ravenwood Nursing and Rehab Center on Thursday, September 24, 2009 of natural causes.
Effie was born February 21, 1919, at Chester, the daughter of Curtis and Emma (Begeman) Tibbals.
She graduated from Chester High School in 1937 and earned her teaching certificate from ISTC. On March 14, 1943, she married Charles V. Morris  in Chester. He died January 5, 1992.
Mrs. Morris taught in country schools and was a substitute in Waterloo Schools, then taught in Dunkerton Schools until retirement  in 1972.
She was a member of Immanuel Presbyterian Church and taught Sunday School and was active in Church Circle. She was also a member of a local camping club. She and her husband had a summer home (River of Lakes Resort) in Bagley, Wisc. She enjoyed cooking and reading.
Survivors include three daughters, Betty (Pat) Vollbrecht, of Waterloo, Jane (Dave) Annett of Lomita, Cal. and Charlotte (Keith) Haycraft, Evansdale, Iowa; one son, Charles D. (Laurie) Morris of Cedar Falls, Iowa; eight grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; three sisters, Tressa Albert of  Lime Springs, Iowa, Frances Poppenga of Lennox, SD, and Clarice (Darrell) Crouse of Waterloo; and one sister-in-law, Shirley Tibbals, of Evansdale, Iowa.
She was preceded by her husband Charles; sister, Edith Alberts; brother, Curtis Tibbals; and grandson Timothy Vollbrecht.
Services were held on September 30 at Immanuel Presbyterian Church with burial at Waterloo Cemetery. Memorials can be directed to the family. Condolences may be left at http://www.LockeFuneralHome.com

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Murder on the menu in Lime Springs

Who murdered Pepi Roni, owner of La Sperenza? Find out Thursday, October 8. The restaurant sits in the middle of Lime Springs’ Little Italy (approximately where the Community Center is located).
As diners enter La Sperenza, with doors opening at 5:30, the succulent aroma of home-cooked pasta is drifting from Lime Springs’ most popular Italian eatery,  but something else is heating up in the kitchen . . . cold-blooded murder!
Restaurant-owner Pepi Roni has been shot in the back with his own pistol! Tonight, his family and friends will gather to pay their respects to poor Pepi, but one of the guests won’t be shedding any tears.
The suspect may be a member of the United Methodist Women, who is sponsoring the dinner theatre of “Pasta, Passion and Pistols,”  or another member of the church.
Who done it?
Only director Annette Rubin knows, but it could be Rocco Scarfazzi (Gary Gassett). Pepi’s twin brother is a tough-talking no-nonsense Italian business man. In addition to his vineyards and real estate holdings, it is rumored Rocco is in the ‘laundering’ business. He had no love for his brother Pepi but his reasons are his own . . . capische?
Another likely suspect is Tara Misu (Raelonna Patrick of Riceville). Tara is Rocco’s vivacious young fiance. She was just an upstairs maid in Rocco’s villa until she swept him off his feet.  Now Tara keeps a smile on his face and a firm grip on Rocco’s assets.
Could the murderer be Mama Rosa (Phyl Stevenson)? For 25 years, Mama Rosa, Pepi’s grieving widow, cooked the pasta while Pepi greeted La Sperenza’s dinner guests. In all the years they were married, not once did they argue.  Had something finally boiled over in Rosa’s kitchen?
Could Marco Roni (Jim Rahlf) be the culprit? Pepi and Mama Rosa’s only son was expected to take over the restaurant after his parents retired. Marco hates waiting tables. His goal is to play on a World Cup soccer team but his papa has been keeping him permanently on the bench.
Could Pepi and Rosa’s beautiful daughter Angel (Pastor Candie) have snuffed out her father’s life? It was Pepi’s dream that his “Angel” would marry a good Italian boy, have some children and carry on the family traditions.  Angel has a few fantasies of her own though and one of them is that hunk, Bo Jalais. Mama-mia!
Bo Jalais (Pastor Mike) is a cousin of a cousin of Rocco’s. Bo manages the Scarfazzi vineyards.  He comes from a long line of French wine makers and no one knows ‘ze’ grape like Bo. An important man in the Scarfazzi organization . . . what could Bo possibly have to “wine” about?
Father Alfredo (as yet, not cast) is an Italian priest and long-time family friend of the Roni’s and the Scarfazzi’s. The good priest has heard their confessions and knows their sins.
Clair Voyant (Laney Stevenson) is Rosa’s best friend and astrology advisor. Clair’s talents include an ability to communicate with the spirit world and see into the future.
Come hungry for an authentic Italian dinner with Italian bread and breadsticks, tossed Italian salad, baked ziti, roasted red peppers, three bean salad, Tiramisu and wine (red and white grape juice), coffee and water.
Those wishing to attend should make reservations with Rubin, Phyllis Stevenson or Dorothy Anderlik. No need to pay in advance as a free-will offering will be taken the night of the meal.

Who murdered Pepi Roni, owner of La Sperenza? Find out Thursday, October 8. The restaurant sits in the middle of Lime Springs’ Little Italy (approximately where the Community Center is located).

As diners enter La Sperenza, with doors opening at 5:30, the succulent aroma of home-cooked pasta is drifting from Lime Springs’ most popular Italian eatery,  but something else is heating up in the kitchen . . . cold-blooded murder!

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Making annual SCD festival better

How to make Sweet Corn Days better was the main topic of conversation for the Lime Springs Community Club’s first meeting after the celebration.
The club officially voted to make Sweet Corn Days the second full weekend in August from now on. It used to be the second Sunday, but then the celebration went to two days, sometimes making the celebration the first Saturday and second Sunday. That would have happened in 2010. The second Sunday would have coincided with Wapsi Day in Riceville, so the celebration will be 13-15, 2010.
Dorene Burnikel said she heard good things about the band. President Curt Tienter added, “I heard no complaints about the music all weekend.” He did mention it might be a good idea to look for a different stage, as the very nice stage used this year cost $1,000.
Dan Evans sent word there were 46 entries for the car show, which he felt was a good number considering the rainy forecast.
It was suggested to have the streets swept a few weeks earlier than the week of the celebration. It was also mentioned Mel Johnson donated his time and equipment for sweeping the streets.
Marcie Klomp said it might be a good idea to move the ear of corn inside at night on Sweet Corn weekend because someone had climbed on it. “Butch Burnikel and friends did a great job redoing the float this year and I’m sure they do not want to do it again!”
Club and community members were reminded the reason the ball games are being managed by an out-of-towner, Jeff Wilson, is that there are not enough workers to take over the huge tournament. “We do not have the manpower,” said Jill Johnson. “He does a good job. People from the bigger cities come back year after year and it brings people into town.”
In connection with that part of town, it was mentioned something should be done about people breaking into the pool over Sweet Corn Weekend. They usually go in with dirty clothes, which makes cleaning the pool that much harder.
It was mentioned to maybe have a security person stationed at the pool and park area next year.
Other suggestions included bringing back the tractor show. Also, the group should sell beer later than midnight since people just went into the bars and brought it out. The Community Club might as well make money after midnight, also.
There are a number of T-shirts and caps left over and will be sold at Christmas in Lime Springs.
• In other business, it was mentioned the youth group made a nice amount of money selling glow necklaces on Friday and Saturday nights of Sweet Corn Days. The youth also ended its residential flag project for the year after Labor Day. Flags in the business district will be set out one more time—on Veterans Day, November 11.
• Butch Burnikel of the Safe Routes to School group talked about painting the lines at intersections near the school and at the five-way intersection at Main Street. “I thought they looked good. But, they will have to be repainted again.”
• Dennis Langreck is still making progress on getting a biking/walking trail from Lime Springs to Lidtke Mill. The next step is to talk with individuals who can help with raising money for the project  through grants and fund-raisers.
• Gary Klomp explained how Steve Timmerman has been preparing the cement at the swimming pool for a covering. “At one of the points where there was a crack, he cut down to the asphalt (which was the first layer ever put in the bottom when the pool was built in 1955). He will need four to five people to help when pouring cement.”
After the bottom is cemented, it will need to be sand blasted and power washed to prepare it before it gets sealant added.
• The club has been using a gator donated by Boos Implement for watering plants but was told it might not be available next year. Steve Johnson offered to look into costs of a gator or golf cart for the club to own.
• Holly Kitchen has agreed to be in charge of the Halloween Party, which will be held Saturday, October 31 at the Community Center.
• The Community Club will again sponsor Festival of Trees, with some sort of lunch on November 29. Christmas in Lime Springs will be Sunday, December 6.
• Beverley Copeman and Betty DeRuiter offered to bring treats to the October 19 meeting.

How to make Sweet Corn Days better was the main topic of conversation for the Lime Springs Community Club’s first meeting after the celebration.

The club officially voted to make Sweet Corn Days the second full weekend in August from now on. It used to be the second Sunday, but then the celebration went to two days, sometimes making the celebration the first Saturday and second Sunday. That would have happened in 2010. The second Sunday would have coincided with Wapsi Day in Riceville, so the celebration will be 13-15, 2010.

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Economic Development

Ken Paxton, Howard County Economic Development Director, was unable to attend the Lime Springs Community Club meeting, but he did give an update on local happenings.
• “The Bio-Mass project (called Prairies Edge Renewables) is completing the first half of the feasibility study. It will for sure be located in Howard County and in the next two weeks a location is being looked at.” He said a prime spot is at the Lime Springs Industrial Park, near the Travel Plaza. Paxton explained the spot is prime because no other location has ever been mentioned!
• The Alco ground-breaking should be taking place soon. It is set to open the first part of January 2010.
• The Board of Supervisor’s Revolving Loan Fund is done and the first loan was approved two weeks ago for a quilt shop, which wants to open in Cresco.
• Some other business-related items on his agenda have been working with a local land owner to develop an Off-Road Vehicle Park near Elma. The land currently has trails and they are planning to add camping facilities. Also, Steuart Laboratories is working to build a new manufacturing facility in Cresco. It would open in the spring and bring in 10 new jobs.
“Lots of good things are going on,” Paxton concluded.
Ken Paxton

Ken Paxton

Ken Paxton, Howard County Economic Development Director, was unable to attend the Lime Springs Community Club meeting, but he did give an update on local happenings.

• “The Bio-Mass project (called Prairies Edge Renewables) is completing the first half of the feasibility study. It will for sure be located in Howard County and in the next two weeks a location is being looked at.” He said a prime spot is at the Lime Springs Industrial Park, near the Travel Plaza. Paxton explained the spot is prime because no other location has ever been mentioned!

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Save labels for Preschool

Angel Dietz, three-year-old Spring Ahead Preschool Teacher stands next to the donation box in the lobby of C US Bank in Lime Springs for Campbells labels and Kwik Trip Milk Moola lids and Donut and Dough labels.
“The last things I got were gross motor balls, which are big balls to improve the large motor skills in the students,” said Dietz. In the past, she has “purchased” magnifying glasses, binoculars and other items she uses for curriculum.
“Right now, I need 500 more points to get a healthy eating kit.”
The entire label is needed from Campbells to be eligible. From the lids and labels from Kwik Trip, the preschool receives cold, hard cash.
Labels and lids can be dropped off at the bank or at the Lime Springs United Methodist Church.
Dietz added she appreciated how the UMW had donated half the labels it collected in the past to the preschool. “Every little bit helps,” she said.
Angel Dietz

Angel Dietz

Angel Dietz, three-year-old Spring Ahead Preschool Teacher stands next to the donation box in the lobby of C US Bank in Lime Springs for Campbells labels and Kwik Trip Milk Moola lids and Donut and Dough labels.

“The last things I got were gross motor balls, which are big balls to improve the large motor skills in the students,” said Dietz. In the past, she has “purchased” magnifying glasses, binoculars and other items she uses for curriculum.

“Right now, I need 500 more points to get a healthy eating kit.”

The entire label is needed from Campbells to be eligible. From the lids and labels from Kwik Trip, the preschool receives cold, hard cash.

Labels and lids can be dropped off at the bank or at the Lime Springs United Methodist Church.

Dietz added she appreciated how the UMW had donated half the labels it collected in the past to the preschool. “Every little bit helps,” she said.