Running for council

 

Walter McIntoshThe town election for this year will be interesting as there are two individuals running for mayor and five running for three seats on the council in Lime Springs. Chester has two candidates for two seats, but a person never knows what the outcome could be.
Lime Springs mayor
Voters in Lime Springs will be given the opportunity to go with experience or make a change as Walter McIntosh faces off against Barb Robinson.
McIntosh has been mayor in Lime Springs for 18 years, so he knows the ins and outs of city government, but newcomer Robinson has her own ideas and experience.
The incumbent and wife Beverly have lived in Lime Springs since 1986 and have two grown children and five grandchildren.

Club ready for Christmas

 

Preparations for Christmas celebrations was the main topic of business at the Community Club meeting on October 19.
Kareen and Jill Johnson said the Festival of Trees will again be planned for the Sunday right after Thanksgiving, November 29. It will be held from 5:00-7:00. Continue reading

Economic Development

(Economic Development Director Ken Paxton spoke at the Lime Springs Community Club meeting on October 19 and also with the Lime Springs Herald about what is happening in Howard County.)
Paxton saved the best for last when giving his report, but, for this article, the best will go first.

Patriotic Veterans Day Banquet

-i-vfw-donna

Nate Thorson presents Donna Zweibohmer with a Gold Star Banner, for losing her husband, George Fogarty in Vietnam. She is with her husband Joe.

Even big, strong soldiers, who experienced the worst that life could throw at them, were brushing a tear from their eye as family members of fallen comrades accepted a Gold Star Banner. The ceremony was held at the third annual Patriotic Veterans Day Banquet on October 24.

The first to go forward was Donna Zweibohmer, whose first husband, George Fogarty of Elma, was killed in the Vietnam war when he was just 20 years old. She was accompanied by her husband Joe, who is a veteran. She also has had three sons in the Army, one of whom is still serving, and a daughter-in-law who served and son-in-law who is serving.
Also receiving Gold Star Banners as family members of George Fogarty were sisters Ann Meirick and Judy Becthold.
Margaret Walter accepted a Gold Star Banner for her brother, Lloyd C. Wohlford who was killed one month after his 20th birthday in Vietnam.

Missing men remembered

 

Rick Busch at right explains the Missing Man Table.One of the most poignant parts of the program was the POW/MIA Missing Man Table. It was explained by Rick Busch that approximately 1,786 Americans are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War, 8,100 from the Korean War, more than 78,000 from World War II, 126 from the Cold War and one soldier is classified Missing/Captured from the Gulf War as of 2003.

Mildred Meier-Peters, 89, L. Spr.

-i-obit-mildred-Mildred Meier-Peters, 89, of Lime Springs, Iowa, passed away on Saturday, October 24, 2009 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Funeral services will be held on Thursday, October 29, 2009 at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Lime Springs at 12:00 p.m.  Friends may call one hour prior to services at the church. Burial will be in Saratoga Cemetery following services at 2:30 p.m.
Mildred was born on October 25, 1919, one of nine children born to Henry and Mildred Aebly. The Aebly family resided in the town of Spencer, Iowa. Growing up with eight siblings there was always something to do. The children enjoyed playing together and visiting relatives who lived on farms. Mildred helped her mother with laundry and housework and especially enjoyed working with her dad in the garden.

Patriotic Veterans Day Banquet

Pretty Boy Floyd escapes officers at McIntire

by Marcie Klomp
That was the headline of the Lime Springs Herald on October 18, 1934. According to local legend, the famous gangster Charles “Pretty Boy” Floyd hid out in Howard and Mitchell counties—specifically at Bonair and McIntire—in the 1930s. Seventy-five years ago, on October 11, 1934, there was a shootout in McIntire, allegedly with Public Enemy Number One at the time and two other men.
“My bedtime stories were about Pretty Boy Floyd and bootleggers,” said Beverly (Owens) Exberg, whose father, Howard County Deputy Sheriff William Owens was involved in that shootout.
Exberg’s aunt, Eleanor Eischeid, who lives in Cresco, got a first-hand account of the gunfight from her brother. “He said they learned Pretty Boy Floyd and another friend were hanging out at a country house at McIntire. A Federal man (A.G. Haight) and Bill, or Ding as everybody called him, went looking.”
Rumor had it the gangster was in the area and a trap was planned for Friday, October 12. The two lawmen were in the area gathering information when they went to the  Bosteter farm (owned by Lee or Al-possibly Lee’s father), one and three-quarters miles south of McIntire. They observed  a man standing in the yard, who Owens later said looked like Floyd, and didn’t think anything of it until they saw him leave in a V-8 Ford and pick up two men who were in the corn field. The officers quickly followed in Owens’ 1933 Chevrolet.
The three bandits were unfamiliar with the area and went down a dead end road. The local deputy knew it was a dead end and stopped the car. “Ding and the Federal Agent got out of the car and laid on the ground. When Pretty Boy’s car came back by, they were shooting a lot and the car got hit twice. If they had been in the car, Ding could have been killed,” said Eischeid. The officers gave chase again, but the gangsters quickly outdistanced them.
From a 2000 interview with the Lime Springs Herald, Lillian Hale remembered she was a junior at Riceville High School. She said most of the town knew Floyd was in the area. Her brother, Arthur Kesten was a neighbor of the Bosteter family at the time. She recalled, “The kids who lived north and east of Riceville were not allowed to go home. They told us what was going on and we stayed at school until it was over.”
The bandits got away and just 11 days later, Floyd was no longer Public Enemy Number One as he was killed at East Liverpool, Ohio.
It was quite the story to be told—being shot at by Pretty Boy Floyd and living to tell the tale. Exberg, who now lives in Texas, said, “The McIntire story was in a detective magazine, but we never kept it. It was also in a comic book.”
She laughs how the story was told to her at bedtime. “My dad explained Howard County was like a highway between Chicago and Minneapolis. Baby Face Nelson and Dillinger came through.” There was a lot of bootlegging going on in the area. “People made their own liquor and had their own stills. The officers would go out and confiscate it, taking it to the courthouse. One time it wasn’t capped properly and it blew up. Daddy said the court house reeked for a long time.”
It was a different time, back in the 1930s. Owens recounted stories of shootouts, bootlegging and suicides to his daughter. Times were tough and there were many suicides in the area the Sheriff’s Department had to respond to.
Exberg said her dad would have to cut down suicides or take care of them in other ways for the families. “My mom was not happy with his line of work. She especially wasn’t happy with the bullet holes in the car. They were just dating and I think they broke up for a while.” Deputy Owens must have decided to go with love rather than gun battles because in 1935 he left the Sheriff’s Department to work for the government. He ended up working for the Farmers Home Administration. Will Owens was killed in a car accident in 1963, leaving his daughter with plenty of memories.
McIntire was not the only place where Pretty Boy Floyd is rumored to have hung out. The little town of Bonair, between Lime Springs and Cresco, also boasts hiding out the gangster.
The late Leonard Sekora lived in the Bonair area most of his life. In an article from 2000, Sekora remembered Pretty Boy was said to always wear a blue suit. He also said he would shoot wild ducks with a machine gun.
Russell Fitzgerald said Pretty Boy stayed at a Medhaug farm, which is the first corner west of Bonair and the first place north. It is located across the road from the hog houses. He remembers Wally Tank telling him Floyd always had his car parked outside the bedroom window, facing the road, for a quick get-away. The original house is no longer there.
EdnaMae Fagner Crow also recalls hearing some stories—and machine gun fire—when Pretty Boy was supposedly in the Bonair area.
Her home was near enough that she and her family could hear the gangsters practicing shooting their machine guns. “They were about a mile or two east of our place. We heard they were there and we’d hear machine guns. I don’t know if they were hunting rabbits or target practice. I would stay indoors to not get  a stray shell.” She didn’t think the farm the bandits stayed at belonged to the Medhaugs because a Medhaug family lived just north of her folks’, but perhaps it was another Medhaug who was living at the bandit farm house.
Her late husband, Dale Fagner, told her that when he was young, he had found some moonshine jugs in a culvert. His father told him to stay away from the area. Whether this was related to Floyd or not, it was still illegal.
But it wasn’t all bullets and bravado when Floyd was thought to be in the area. Hope Briggs, who now lives in Grand Meadow but grew up in LeRoy recalls, “I was at a dance in an old barn-auditorium in McIntire. At one dance, there was a stranger and we asked who it was. Someone finally said it was Pretty Boy Floyd. He didn’t bother anybody and just looked around. He wasn’t dressed like our local people. He was dressed better than the average guy who came in from the farm.”
Many local stories have the mysterious stranger in the area as Pretty Boy Floyd. But was it really? Read on to find out one theory.
Russell Fitzgerald, Eleanor Eischeid and Beverly (Owens) Exberg share their stories about Pretty Boy Floyd.

Russell Fitzgerald, Eleanor Eischeid and Beverly (Owens) Exberg share their stories about Pretty Boy Floyd.

by Marcie Klomp

That was the headline of the Lime Springs Herald on October 18, 1934. According to local legend, the famous gangster Charles “Pretty Boy” Floyd hid out in Howard and Mitchell counties—specifically at Bonair and McIntire—in the 1930s. Seventy-five years ago, on October 11, 1934, there was a shootout in McIntire, allegedly with Public Enemy Number One at the time and two other men. Continue reading

Crow on Honor Flight

The group was hushed as they looked around the memorial . . . each with his or her own memories. Remembering men and women who became life-long friends and remembering those who didn’t make it. That was the scene as 108 World War II veterans visited the Memorial on October 10.
EdnaMae Fagner Crow, formerly of Lime Springs, now of Cresco, was one of those who was able to go on the latest Honor Flight, which left out of Rochester Airport. It was extra special for her as her son, Dale Fagner, Jr. accompanied her as a guardian. Others going from Cresco were veterans Vincent Hornberger, Merlin Kratz, Joe Ferrie, Raymond Murray and Woodrow Dvorak. Veterans Administrator Dee Hosek was also a guardian on the flight.
It was a little misty out as the group arrived at the World War II Memorial. “They gave us ponchos. It was very
emotional and a day of appreciation,” Crow said. “One lady came up to me and said she was glad to see a woman who was in the service.”
It also brought back memories of how she joined the Marine Corp. Crow, her sister Shirley and Esther Monthy Yancy were living with an uncle in California. “Shirley wanted to get into the Navy but she didn’t pass because of her eyes, so she into the Air Force. I thought it would be fun if all three of us joined the military.
“I was home sick on Valentine’s Day and it came over the radio they were enlisting women in the Marine Corp and that sounded like something I wanted to do. On Easter Sunday, I went to San Francisco and was sworn in.”
She did need her parents’ permission, which was given, but they never really said much about their two daughters going to war.
Crow was active duty from April 26, 1943 until December 28, 1945. She was discharged with a rank of Sgt. and was with the Engineer Battalion, serving in Hawaii, Camp LeJeune, NC and Washington, D.C. She just recently received the WWII Victory Medal, Marksman Qualification Badge (which was uncommon for a woman to qualify for) and Asiatic-Pacific Campaign.
On her application for the Honor Flight, Crow explained, “I worked in Personnel, checking personnel files for correctness as soldiers’ families needed to be notified of KIA, WIA and MIA.” On mess duty, she cleaned garbage cans and was done at noon. She would then go dancing at the rec hall.
Besides visiting the WWII Memorial, the group saw Iwo Jima, Arlington, the Pentagon and the Lincoln Memorial.
It is funny how things work out. “When we stopped for dinner at the Women’s Memorial, there were no tables to sit at, so we sat on the floor by a wall. That’s where we saw a quote.”
Her son, Dale, read the words engraved in the wall, “You hear a large boom. You can also hear them when they launch. They make a kind of hollow popping sound . . . We are being mortared probably five nights a week.”
Crow explained, “After reading the quote, Dale said to Dee, whom he had met several times before at meetings, ‘That sounds like something you’d say.’” And sure enough . . . the person being quoted was Sgt. Deann Hosek, US Army Reserve, Iraq and she had no idea it was there! It’s a small world! If there had been empty tables, they might not have noticed it.
Hosek said, “I assume they quoted me during a phone interview I did in 2004 or 2005 with Kate Scott from the Women’s Memorial.”
Crow said she appreciated the work that went into all the memorials. She was overwhelmed by the appreciation shown to her and the other veterans on the trip.
The group was given some special momentos, including the book “WWII Memorial, Jewel of the Mall”, booklets on the Rochester Memorial, a book with info on all who went on the flight, a hat and a pin. The most treasured items were the letters handed to all the veterans. Some, like Crow, had personal letters from family members, but all had letters written by school children from Rochester and Illinois thanking them for their service.
“When we left Washington, D.C., there were a lot of people there thanking us and when we got to Rochester, people were standing six to eight deep, welcoming us home. There was also music and more gifts given to us,” she said.
Crow urged all veterans to try to go on this flight. Although the group was at the airport at 5:30 a.m. and didn’t return until 9:30 that evening, she said it wasn’t tiring. “It was so elating and uplifting it wasn’t tiring, until towards the end. There was so much we saw, I can’t believe it could be contained all in one day. But it was.”
Honor Flight attendees Those from the Cresco group included, in front: EdnaMae Crow, Woodrow Dvorak and guardian Lisa Defries. Back: Vince Hornberger, guardian Dee Hosek, Joe Ferrie, Raymond Murray, guardian Dale Fagner, Jr. and Merlin Kratz. (Photo submitted by EdnaMae Crow.)

Honor Flight attendees Those from the Cresco group included, in front: EdnaMae Crow, Woodrow Dvorak and guardian Lisa Defries. Back: Vince Hornberger, guardian Dee Hosek, Joe Ferrie, Raymond Murray, guardian Dale Fagner, Jr. and Merlin Kratz. (Photo submitted by EdnaMae Crow.)

The group was hushed as they looked around the memorial . . . each with his or her own memories. Remembering men and women who became life-long friends and remembering those who didn’t make it. That was the scene as 108 World War II veterans visited the Memorial on October 10.

Continue reading

Partners in Progress busy

The Chester Partners in Progress group learned at its meeting on October 14 the Chester Booster Club disbanded officially. Members were grateful when they were told the Booster Club, which has served Chester well for 25 years, turned over their assets to the new club. This included money left in their account, the jail, Smiley Train and other items.
The group was pleased with the turnout for the pumpkin decorating project and coloring contest at the Fall Festival on October 10. Thirty pumpkins were painted and 30 pictures were turned in for the coloring contest. The parents appreciated a place for their kids to be while they shopped at the craft tables.
Updating the City Park play area and equipment and getting in a canoe access area are still planned projects.
A discussion then occurred about what to do for Christmas in Chester. The Booster Club has had a Hunters Widow Day the second Saturday in December, so the group decided to have the Chester Christmas celebration the same day. This year, that will be December 12.
The group also decided to stay with what has worked in the past and will have a craft show at the Community Center from 9:00-2:00.
The children’s activities worked for the Fall Festival so the group will have  cookie decorating for the kids in the morning. A lunch will also be held.
To urge people into the business district, Santa will be arriving at City Hall at 3:00 with a drawing following his visiting with children and adults.
There will probably be wagon rides with caroling and a Christmas light judging contest.
Everyone is invited to join the group. Meetings are held the second Wednesday of the month at Stateline Pizza. The next meeting is November 11.

The Chester Partners in Progress group learned at its meeting on October 14 the Chester Booster Club disbanded officially. Members were grateful when they were told the Booster Club, which has served Chester well for 25 years, turned over their assets to the new club. This included money left in their account, the jail, Smiley Train and other items.

Continue reading