Ready to start new chapter

 

Emma Edwards, with her parents, Jill and Larry at her new home. Photo submitted

The goal of every parent is to raise their children to be independent—to be on their own and live life to the fullest. Come to think of it, that is also the goal of children—to get out from under their parents and prove to the world their worth.

That simple goal was a faraway dream for Emma Edwards of Lime Springs until just five months ago, when the 24-year-old moved into her own house in Rochester with two roommates.

Thanksgiving 101

Trent Pisney, Trey Rankinand Dylan Rahlf show some food from their kindergarten kitchen they will be eating for Thanksgiving.

Each year, the Lime Springs Herald asks the kindergartners some Thanksgiving questions. Sometimes the answers are correct sometimes not so correct, but all of them are interesting!

Carter Fousek: We’ll have turkey and lettuce. Mom will make the turkey. I don’t know how. And Grandma brings the pie.

Do-gooders named at meeting

After the Community Club meeting, Bernard Roesler and Joyce Koster look at the arial map, donated by C US Bank after its remodel, to the Community Center. The map is a point of interest for many who see the rail cars sitting on the tracks, the foundation for Tomkins Apartments and only one house in Kitchen Addition and wonder at the year it was taken.

With Thanksgiving around the corner, some local volunteers were unofficially recognized at the Community Club’s  November 16 meeting.

Members pointed out the amount of work Steve Timmerman, former Lime Springs boy and resident of New Hampton, has been putting in at the pool. Jill Johnson said, “He’s working his fingers to the bone.” Duane Copeman agreed. “He has spent a lot of time down there.”
Timmerman has been the technical support and laborer for jack hammering and sandblasting the cement pool bottom.
Evelyn Truka also expressed admiration for the Junior Community Club for their help at events—most recently Halloween. “They hopped right in to help,” she said. Kareen Johnson agreed. “They’re a great group of kids.”
Holly Kitchen was also recognized for being in charge of the Halloween party and she offered to do it again next year.
Marcie Klomp then thanked the entire community for their donation of cans to the Junior Club. “We get about $100 a month from the cans, which goes directly to the pool and parks. So, by helping the Junior Club, the community is helping itself.”

David Thomas, 75

David Thomas was born in Cresco, Iowa on April 14, 1934 to William and Ruth Thomas. Due to complications at birth David was limited, but in 1976 new opportunities opened for him. He moved to Elgin, Texas where he made his home near his sister Dolores and Arbie Johnson and their family. David soon had employment, and over the next many years, he won the respect and admiration of those with whom he worked. His final years were spent working for his nephews Brent and Jay Johnson at their manufacturing business in Elgin.

Larson tells of war experience

 

Michael Larson with his parents, Harlan and Mary Larson of Lime Springs.

“He played football on the playground. He ate in the cafeteria. And, he sat on the benches you are sitting on right now,” said Mrs. Goodner at the Veterans Day Program on November 11. “Now he’s grown up. We sent him cards and letters and boxes. He got so much soap, he must have been the cleanest person in Iraq. Here is Michael Larson.”

Johnson family Thanksgiving

Earl and Kareen Johnson family The Earl Johnson family has sponsored the Lime Springs Community Thanksgiving dinner for 14 years. Pictured with Earl and Kareen Johnson are, in front, Lindsey and Beau Johnson, Chelsea Johnson, Jill Johnson, Kathy Lichty, Kalley Lichty, Nathan and Kyle Burnikel and Gayle Burnikel. Back: Luke Johnson, Steve Johnson, Tim Lichty, Josh Lichty and Dennis Burnikel.

Some of the strongest traditions are associated with holidays and the next holiday on the calendar is Thanksgiving. Sometimes those traditions change due to growing families. The Johnson family Thanksgiving changed 14 years ago when they invited the community to their Thanksgiving dinner.

Booster Club accomplished much

 

Getting new playground equipment for Chester Park was one of the Booster Club’s biggest projects.

As one era ends, another begins. When membership dwindled in the Chester Booster Club, the core members felt it was too difficult to continue with the group and all of the activities associated with it, including Old Settlers Day.

In September 2009, the Booster Club officially gave all of its assets to Partners in Progress. But, the Booster Club had a great 25-year run in supporting Chester activities.
Charter member Rhonda Larson explained, “We disbanded because it became a lot of work for just a few people to do and our jobs did not allow us the extra time necessary to continue what we had been doing.”

Wayne Solomon, 86, Cresco

 

Wayne Kenneth Solomon, 86, of Cresco, Iowa, went to be with his Lord and Savior on November 14, 2009, at the Patty Elwood Center in rural Cresco, where he had lived for the past two years.
Wayne Kenneth Solomon was born July 17, 1923 in Spencer, Iowa, the son of Lloyd Sanford Solomon, Sr. and Myrtle Gertrude (Warren) Solomon. Wayne had two siblings, Lloyd S., Jr. and Carol Jean (Solomon) Ward.
Wayne graduated from Riceville High School, Riceville, Iowa in 1942. On January 15, 1943, Wayne was inducted in the United States Army at Camp Dodge, Iowa. He served in Italy during World War II as a heavy truck operator hauling supplies. He was honorably discharged on January 4, 1946 at Camp Grant, Illinois.

Anna May Davis, 103, Lime Springs


Anna May Davis, 103, of Lime Springs, Iowa passed away on Monday, November 9, 2009 at the Patty Elwood Center in Cresco, IA.

 

Anna May Davis was born on July 21, 1906. She attended public school in Lime Springs and graduated from Lime Springs High in 1923. Anna May then chose to attend Cornell College in Mt. Vernon to study Public School Music Education. She went on to graduate in 1927.

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Council tackles many issues

 

-i-council-truck

The Chevron striping has been completed on the grass rig. The other trucks are waiting to be worked on.

One of the longest ever Lime Springs City Council meetings took place on November 3 as the regular meeting was about two-and-a-half hours long. The council then went into closed session.

Because City Clerk Larry Gates has been ill and Deputy Clerk Michelle Bakken gave her notice, the first order of business was to appoint a temporary Deputy Clerk. Mayor Walter McIntosh suggested Jill Johnson. Councilman Corey Gates commented, “I thought we had talked about having Irene Eiffler help out.”
The mayor replied Johnson had offered to help if Bakken would also help and he had accepted. The council all agreed.
At that point, Johnson took over taking notes from Councilwoman Carla Moser.
There were no minutes from the October meeting due to the the City Clerk not being in the office.
The bills were discussed and confirmed to be paid.
Fire Chief Tony Roberts said reflectors were being put on all the trucks where needed. The grass rig was already completed. He also said the new tag axle was installed on the tanker.
Bill Ziegler of Upper Explorerland came before the council with Jerry Johnson to discuss a CDBG grant being sought by the Spring Ahead Learning Center.
The $300,000 grant needs to go through the City of Lime Springs.
The council also voted on having Skott and Anderson Co. of Mason City as architects for the project. “They have worked with Jerry and group before,” said Ziegler.
Johnson added, “When we went through the criteria on them and the other company that applied [AHTS of Waterloo]. Skott and Anderson was a couple of points higher. So it is Rob Hughes’ and my recommendation to hire them.”
Corey Gates said, “I respect Jerry and Rob’s decision.” The rest of the council also agreed.
The Council was told the estimated cost of the learning center/storm shelter is $1.3 million—most of which is being sought from at least three grants, the school and other sources.
A beer license was renewed for Tank & Tummy.
The mayor announced he had learned health insurance premiums were going up nearly 40 percent. “It was $600-plus per month per employee and now it will be around $860 per month per employee.”
It was mentioned many companies used to pay for all of the health insurance. “But that’s in the past,” said Corey.
Water bills were dicussed. The water bills from the end of September had not been sent out yet and October is over also. The Council said they would work with individuals if the next bill was too high when received.
Water bills in general were discussed with some as old as December.
Attorney Kevin Schoeberl, who attended the meeting, suggested old water bills can be assessed to the landowner’s taxes, even if it is a rental property. The Council will work on updating the ordinance on paying water bills and when residents would be getting a shut-off notice.
Steve Timmerman gave a pool update. He said there were two more pieces of cement that needed to be replaced. He said he was planning to work on sandblasting Thursday through Sunday.
“The caulk is coming out with some difficulty,” he said.
Barry Johnson wanted to know how to go about looking for property lines. A fence was put up close or on his property line and he didn’t know it was being planned. “I just want to make sure it was done properly.”
Schoeberl said most ordinances say the fence needed to be three feet from the property line. Roger Lepa told Johnson that Dennis Grabau, city maintenance, could use a metal detector to find the stakes used to determine property lines in Lime Springs.
The council then went to closed session at the request of City Clerk Larry Gates so the council could evaluate the clerk.
The next council meeting is scheduled early in the month, December 1.

One of the longest ever Lime Springs City Council meetings took place on November 3 as the regular meeting was about two-and-a-half hours long. The council then went into closed session.Because City Clerk Larry Gates has been ill and Deputy Clerk Michelle Bakken gave her notice, the first order of business was to appoint a temporary Deputy Clerk. Mayor Walter McIntosh suggested Jill Johnson. Councilman Corey Gates commented, “I thought we had talked about having Irene Eiffler help out.” The mayor replied Johnson had offered to help if Bakken would also help and he had accepted. The council all agreed.At that point, Johnson took over taking notes from Councilwoman Carla Moser.There were no minutes from the October meeting due to the the City Clerk not being in the office.The bills were discussed and confirmed to be paid.Fire Chief Tony Roberts said reflectors were being put on all the trucks where needed. The grass rig was already completed. He also said the new tag axle was installed on the tanker.Bill Ziegler of Upper Explorerland came before the council with Jerry Johnson to discuss a CDBG grant being sought by the Spring Ahead Learning Center. The $300,000 grant needs to go through the City of Lime Springs.The council also voted on having Skott and Anderson Co. of Mason City as architects for the project. “They have worked with Jerry and group before,” said Ziegler. Johnson added, “When we went through the criteria on them and the other company that applied [AHTS of Waterloo]. Skott and Anderson was a couple of points higher. So it is Rob Hughes’ and my recommendation to hire them.”Corey Gates said, “I respect Jerry and Rob’s decision.” The rest of the council also agreed.The Council was told the estimated cost of the learning center/storm shelter is $1.3 million—most of which is being sought from at least three grants, the school and other sources. A beer license was renewed for Tank & Tummy.The mayor announced he had learned health insurance premiums were going up nearly 40 percent. “It was $600-plus per month per employee and now it will be around $860 per month per employee.” It was mentioned many companies used to pay for all of the health insurance. “But that’s in the past,” said Corey.Water bills were dicussed. The water bills from the end of September had not been sent out yet and October is over also. The Council said they would work with individuals if the next bill was too high when received.Water bills in general were discussed with some as old as December.Attorney Kevin Schoeberl, who attended the meeting, suggested old water bills can be assessed to the landowner’s taxes, even if it is a rental property. The Council will work on updating the ordinance on paying water bills and when residents would be getting a shut-off notice.Steve Timmerman gave a pool update. He said there were two more pieces of cement that needed to be replaced. He said he was planning to work on sandblasting Thursday through Sunday. “The caulk is coming out with some difficulty,” he said.Barry Johnson wanted to know how to go about looking for property lines. A fence was put up close or on his property line and he didn’t know it was being planned. “I just want to make sure it was done properly.”Schoeberl said most ordinances say the fence needed to be three feet from the property line. Roger Lepa told Johnson that Dennis Grabau, city maintenance, could use a metal detector to find the stakes used to determine property lines in Lime Springs.The council then went to closed session at the request of City Clerk Larry Gates so the council could evaluate the clerk.The next council meeting is scheduled early in the month, December 1.